Kickstarter Game — #RPGaDay2015, Day 2

This entry follows the previous memetic post, inspired by Autocratik and noted by Ironbombs.  The official title is the oddly awkward “Kickstarted Game Most Pleased You Backed,” which I would have phrased in one of a dozen different ways.  I’m sure that there is a better, more succinct way of getting this idea across, as this sort of makes my head hurt.

I have to be honest about this.  I really do not have a great track record, insofar as Kickstarter goes.

The very first Kickstarter I ever backed, the one that I created my account simply to pledge money for, never happened.  The ones that I pledged around $100 for?  Yeah, most of those have yet to be fulfilled.  The ones that I pledged the most for?  Haven’t really played any of them, to this point.

And yet, I keep putting money out for these damned things, like the worst sort of KS Apologist, eager to be hurt again.  It would be different if I were possessed of interminable amounts of ready disposable income, but most of the time, these things push the hard edges of my careful budget.  Yet none of this stops me from putting out more money when they come around, cup in hand, to ask for alms and donations.

That aside…

Day 2 — Most Positive Kickstarter RPG Experience

All in all, I’d have to say that the Pathfinder version of the Advanced Bestiary from Green Ronin ranks right at the top.  There are a lot of other possibilities that I could put forth as contenders for this ranking (and I’ll get into those potentialities further down), but this book is everything that it needs to be, at a solid value for what I pledged.

The problem with a lot of Kickstarter campaigns is that, for my dollar, most products end up being better housed in the “wait until it hits retail” category.  Yes, I realize that the money that goes into the Kickstarter campaign helps to improve the finished product, thereby improving the overall value of the game, but so many of these companies treat Kickstarter as a glorified pre-order system.  (I’m looking directly at you, Onyx Path.)  As such, there’s little reason to pledge money beforehand, if you’re going to be paying as much or more than you would at retail.  I’ve heard many stories of people putting $100 into a Kickstarter pledge, only to find out that buying it retail would have saved them 20% overall, and in some cases, the backers would have received their product earlier by not waiting for the fulfillment to arrive in the mail.  (Again, Onyx Path.)

The Advanced Bestiary was delivered to me for the end retail value, with shipping included, which hits the first point directly.

The next point is that this is one of the most useful books that has ever been written for Pathfinder.  I fell in love with the first incarnation of the book, which I believe was solidly D20 (putting it more or less in D&D 3.0, for grognard purposes) and came out in the wake of the D&D 3.5 revision.  This was a book of indispensable utility.  It followed the template system laid out in the D&D Monster Manual, allowing all manner of tweaks to be lain upon monstrous foes.  These ranged from very minor to complete reworkings, allowing an unheard of degree of customization for your campaigns.  If you were running a game concerned with weird, clockwork monstrosities, there was a template to upgrade normal monsters to fit this paradigm.  If you wanted to tweak a normal creature into bipedal version for a weird race, there was a template to make sense of this.  And if you wanted to create some unholy gestalt creature (there was once a discussion of a Gelatinous Beholder), that was entirely within the framework of these rules.

There was an entire line of Advanced books from Green Ronin at the time, but this book was the most useful, far and away.  As such, when it came time to kick for this book, I was immediately on board.  There was nothing particularly revolutionary about the book; it had all been done before, more or less, and this was just the rules upgrade that had been promised.  For me, the fact that it was cleanly laid out, quickly delivered, reasonably priced, and exactly what I wanted ranks it very highly.

In terms of solid contenders for this entry, the next possibility would have to be the Lone Wolf Adventure Game from Cubicle 7.  This has less to do with the game itself, and more to do with the fact that I am really looking forward to the full release of this game and where it goes.  Cubicle 7 manages to put out some of the prettiest games around (Doctor Who, One Ring, and Qin, not to get into the necessary obsession of Kuro), and this is no exception.  As such, the forthcoming products are going to be amazing.  Moreover, I’m really happy with this game because I had a collection of the Lone Wolf Adventure Gamebooks from back in the day, and seeing this world put to paper with the approval of the author is phenomenal.  (Let’s leave aside that I got to meet Joe Dever at Gen Con, which was a hell of a thing.  There are pictures of this floating about, and I’m generally grinning like an idiot.)

Following up, we have the Shadows of Esteren Kickstarters.  I do dearly love this game, but until I manage to actually throw dice, I can’t actually profess my true, deep adoration.  A similar sentiment pervades my outlook on the original Dwarven Forge Kickstarter, since I’ve managed to use the terrain all of once.  There’s a whole stack of Onyx Path Kickstarters, which run a weird path of fascination and disappointment.  They always take forever to arrive, but when they finally show up, the production value tends to be top notch.  (The less said about the Exalted 3rd Edition, the better.)

And finally, the one that I’m looking forward to most happens to be the Call of Cthulhu 7th Edition Kickstarter.  This isn’t because I’m particularly bound to a new edition of a classic game (though, to be honest, it will be a great revision), it’s because the fulfillment of the Kickstarter has apparently shaken up the company so badly that they needed to restructure themselves on a corporate level.  There’s a lot more to it, of course, but the advent of this new system had the end result of disposing of the old guard at Chaosium in order to actually get it to the backers.  Here’s hoping that this portends well for the company going forward.

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Posted on August 6, 2015, in Current Games, Kickstarter and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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