The Economics of Dice

Lately, I’ve run into an interesting phenomenon, due to the peculiarities of Fantasy Flight’s Star Wars line.  As noted previously, the system requires a set of specialized dice suitable only for the Edge of the Empire and Age of Rebellion games.  (When Force and Destiny releases next summer, that will make three game lines, even though they’re all generally playable as one system.)  The dice are available in packs of fourteen for about $15 per set, retail, or $5 for the phone app.  By my reckoning, a player generally needs two sets to be able to assemble the requisite dice pools.

Having gamed as extensively as I have, I’ve amassed a sizable collection of dice over the years.  This includes the old gem dice that I ordered through the mail for TSR’s Marvel Super Heroes game, the decidedly sharp-edged D20 that came un-inked as was the fashion, and the various dice sets that I pick up at the different conventions.  I think nothing of acquiring a new set of dice when the whim strikes, and putting out some scratch for several sets of Fantasy Flight dice was just a side step in my normal habits.

It’s a safe bet to declare that I have over a thousand dice.  And most people I know acquire dice similarly.  Some have very specific requirements for new dice, making them match the products they’re using or specific ideas they have about a game in question.  This was much of the reasoning for picking up Q Workshop dice.  If you’re running Rise of the Runelords, get the officially licensed and properly thematic Runelords dice.  (I haven’t lapsed into this mode, personally, as it could get rather expensive to lay hands on the dice for each individual Adventure Path.  I did buy the Carrion Crown dice, however, but that path has stretched out over the course of three years.)  Similarly, I’ve seen brightly colored dice for superhero games, dark and moody D10’s for White Wolf games, weird green and black dice for Cthulhu and so on.

So, in some ways, it’s kind of funny to hear people whine about having to buy different dice for EotE.  And yet, it’s the common refrain for people who want an excuse to avoid the game anyway.  They can’t be bothered to pick up a set of dice for a game, even though the rule books themselves are factors higher in price.  If you’re willing to put out $250+ for the rule books, what’s $30 for a set of dice?  (This works on standard retail pricing and my contention that two sets are necessary for play.)

Part of it falls back to the specialized nature of the dice.  Outside of the core product, there isn’t much utility for the D6’s, D8’s and D12’s that make up the dice packs.  (And if you’re integrating the X-Wing Miniatures Game, the new D8’s that come with that.)  Logically, you could simply use the charts in the main book and convert your extant dice to the purpose of the new game.  And while this is possible, it’s not a wholly ideal solution, as the chart consultation is a headache and slows down the otherwise fast and loose aspects of using the new dice in the first place.

This argument doesn’t get very far with me, however, given my years of White Wolf and WEG’s D6 Star Wars.  The Storyteller System often required dice pools of a dozen D10’s (or more, if you were playing Exalted), and it wasn’t unheard of to need 20 D6’s for some games of Star Wars.  (There’s also the bizarre footnote of R. Tal’s Dragonball Z game, which technically required several thousand D6’s for a proper Saiyan battle, but there were a number of ways to get around rolling and tallying literal buckets-full of dice.)  And while it was technically true that you could re-purpose your Storyteller dice into an average D&D session, it was pretty unlikely.  If you were playing a game that wasn’t using a standard loadout for dice, you needed to buy dice specifically for the game, no matter what.  I have known people that keep specific dice for specific campaigns, to take it one step farther.

Over the years, my dice have ended up carefully segregated.  My Storyteller dice congregate in one specific bag, where I have another that is devoted to the plethora of D6’s I have amassed over the years.  There’s a bag devoted to D&D/Pathfinder dice of different sorts (mainly according to the specific colored sets), and so on.  My EotE dice have their own dedicated dice canister, as just another set of dice for a specific game.

What I found most interesting in the most recent whinge about having to buy new dice for a new game was that the person that was making the noise was one that didn’t have a lot of room to complain about spending too much on the hobby.  He is well known in the local area for his gaming excesses, between premium hotel rooms at the larger cons and booze to the level that it would cover a car payment.  He’s fully able to drop $4,000 on something like Gen Con, as it’s what he saves up for over the course of the year.  Another $15 for dice is hardly going to break the bank entirely.

And sure…  we all remember being 15 years old, when something like a core rulebook was something that was worked toward and greatly anticipated.  Back in those days, dice were something rare and particular, but that was just part of the overall value and novelty of the hobby at that age.  After a while, a groove is worn in, and there’s no longer any question as to the expense of the hobby.  It’s an expected truth, and for a lot of people, that means that they will concentrate on one game or aspect of the hobby to the careful exclusion of everything else.  Most people have a solid D&D or Pathfinder collection, where others pick up the necessary White Wolf offerings that they need to play.

For me, it means that I’m not going to spend a lot of money on cards or miniatures, since that would cripple my ability to maintain my library.  But then, I’m weird that way.

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Posted on October 7, 2014, in Current Games, Gaming Philosophy, Star Wars and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I honestly expected to have the same problem and hear a lot of dice whinging, but three of my four players bought both a set of dice and the dice app before session one. We ended up with a metric ton of dice… Though only two of us have the rulebook.

    • That’s pretty fortunate, to be honest. I figure that, when the move is done, I’ll try to figure out a system to upgrade my gaming table, which would include a couple of fairly cheap tablets or the like for the various dice apps.

      As to having the books, right now I’m limping along with only a copy for myself. I’ve been debating a print-out of the basic rules from ‘Under a Black Sun’ as a quick reference guide. But as it happens, I’m already starting to hemorrhage players. I may not have enough of a group for the intervening time to need to bother.

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